Do babies have soft spots on back of head?

When should I be concerned about my baby’s soft spot?

If you notice that your baby’s soft spot appears swollen for an extended period of time, that is cause for concern. It could be a sign that your baby’s head is swelling. If your doctor suspects brain swelling, they may request imaging tests and blood work to find out what’s the cause.

Why does my baby have a dip in the back of her head?

It is normal for a fontanel to form an inward curve in infants while their skull is still hardening. But in some cases, it may become sunken, and the cause may need medical treatment. A sunken fontanel, when accompanied by other symptoms, can be a sign of dehydration or malnutrition.

What happens if you touch the soft spot on a baby’s head?

Can I hurt my baby’s brain if I touch the soft spot? Many parents worry that their baby will be injured if the soft spot is touched or brushed over. The fontanel is covered by a thick, tough membrane which protects the brain. There is absolutely no danger of damaging your baby with normal handling.

How long does it take for baby’s head to round out?

Your baby’s head should return to an adorable, round shape anywhere between 2 days and a few weeks after delivery.

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When does babies head stop pulsing?

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Pulsing will stop when the skull bones fuse (at 4 to 8 weeks for the one at the back of the head, and 9 months to 2 years for the soft spot on top). If Baby’s fontanel is sunken, she may be dehydrated.

When does the occipital fontanelle close?

The posterior fontanelle usually closes by age 1 or 2 months. It may already be closed at birth. The anterior fontanelle usually closes sometime between 9 months and 18 months. The sutures and fontanelles are needed for the infant’s brain growth and development.

Why is my baby’s soft spot pulsing?

In some instances, the soft spot on the top of your baby’s head may seem to be pulsating. There is no need to worry—this movement is quite normal and simply reflects the visible pulsing of blood that corresponds to your baby’s heartbeat.