Does my baby have pyloric stenosis?

How do I know if my baby has pyloric stenosis?

Signs include:

  1. Vomiting after feeding. The baby may vomit forcefully, ejecting breast milk or formula up to several feet away (projectile vomiting). …
  2. Persistent hunger. Babies who have pyloric stenosis often want to eat soon after vomiting.
  3. Stomach contractions. …
  4. Dehydration. …
  5. Changes in bowel movements. …
  6. Weight problems.

Do babies with pyloric stenosis poop?

Changes in stools.

Babies with pyloric stenosis usually have fewer, smaller stools (poops) because little or no food is reaching the intestines. Constipation or poop with mucus also can happen.

Are babies with pyloric stenosis fussy?

A baby with pyloric stenosis may: Vomit soon after a feeding. Have a full, swollen upper belly after a feeding. Act fussy and hungry a lot of the time.

Do babies always vomit with pyloric stenosis?

Babies with pyloric stenosis often forcefully vomit since formula or breast milk can’t leave the stomach. Many babies have difficulty gaining weight because they have many episodes of vomiting.

What happens if pyloric stenosis goes untreated?

If left untreated, hypertrophic pyloric stenosis can cause: Dehydration. Electrolyte imbalance. Lethargy.

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Is pyloric stenosis an emergency?

Infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis (IHPS) may be described as a medical emergency or a medical urgency based on how early in the course the patient presents.

Can a baby have pyloric stenosis and still gain weight?

Babies with pyloric stenosis usually have fewer, smaller stools because little or no food is reaching the intestines. Constipation or stools that have mucus in them may also be symptoms. Failure to gain weight and lethargy. Most babies with pyloric stenosis will fail to gain weight or will lose weight.

What age does reflux peak in babies?

Infants are more prone to acid reflux because their LES may be weak or underdeveloped. In fact, it’s estimated that more than half of all infants experience acid reflux to some degree. The condition usually peaks at age 4 months and goes away on its own between 12 and 18 months of age.

Is pyloric stenosis life threatening?

This is a case re-affirming that infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis (IHPS) can present with severe electrolyte abnormalities and can be a medical emergency as seen in this patient.

How do you rule out pyloric stenosis?

Blood tests to check for dehydration or electrolyte imbalance or both. Ultrasound to view the pylorus and confirm a diagnosis of pyloric stenosis. X-rays of your baby’s digestive system, if results of the ultrasound aren’t clear.

Can pyloric stenosis cause reflux?

Diagnosing pyloric stenosis

Pyloric stenosis can be confused with reflux (frequent spit-up) or gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), a condition in which the contents of the stomach come back up. GERD can also cause irritability and poor weight gain.

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Can pyloric stenosis be missed on ultrasound?

If the ultrasonographic findings are negative, perform a UGI study to confirm or rule out other pathology. Ultrasonography, although reliable for diagnosing hypertrophic pyloric stenosis, may miss malrotation, which is the most serious cause of vomiting in infants.